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News from Simon Community Scotland

New film being launched to raise awareness of Simon Community Scotland’s Nightstop Service

A powerful new film about a homeless teenage girl is being launched this week (Wednesday, January 8) at St Mungo’s Academy in Glasgow to raise awareness of Simon Community Scotland’s Nightstop project.

The film, produced by Simon Community Scotland, which works to combat the causes and effects of homelessness, features a teenage girl frightened and alone on the streets at night.

But the hard-hitting film explains ‘It Doesn’t Need to Be Like This’ and offers the young woman a safe place to stay with a Nightstop volunteer host.

It will be shown to fifth and sixth year pupils at EVERY secondary school and students at colleges and universities in Glasgow from January 8.

Simon Community Scotland launched the first stage of their Nightstop campaign – to recruit more volunteer hosts for the service – in October last year with the backing of Deacon Blue star Lorraine McIntosh.

Lorraine revealed for the first time that she had experienced homelessness at the age of 18 when her family lost their home overnight, and the experience has stayed with her for more than 35 years.

Nightstop Glasgow

▶️ Watch | If you are a Glasgow-based 16-25 year-old and you are concerned about having somewhere safe to sleep then we can help. This is our powerful, new Nightstop UK campaign film. It is to be shown to every S5 & S6 pupil across the city, in partnership with Glasgow City Council.

Gepostet von Simon Community Scotland am Montag, 6. Januar 2020

She threw herself behind the Nightstop campaign and asked the people of Glasgow to ‘open their homes and their hearts’ and they did not disappoint.

The charity was overwhelmed with the magnificent response which resulted in nine households signing up and going through training to become hosts. This means they will soon have 18 households in Glasgow who will be able to host young people.

Simon Community Chief Executive Lorraine McGrath, said: “Since we launched in 2018, we have provided 100 safe bed nights of accommodation to young people in crisis, but after this awareness campaign we expect this to rise.

“We were delighted with the response to the first stage of our campaign, and that we’ve had so many people signing up to become volunteers.

“This means that we will be able to help more young people across the city as they need us, keeping them safe and away from ever needing to contemplate a dangerous night on the streets.”

“The cycle of homelessness creates unprecedented risk and danger, for young people those dangers are multiplied across the broad themes of: physical and mental health; drug and alcohol addiction; introduction to criminal activity and/or prostitution. Even one night of sleeping rough can lead to initial exposure to these dangers.

“Offering vulnerable young people a safe, calm place to stay can make all the difference to help them achieve positive outcomes in the future.”

The roll-out of this film has been made possible thanks to help from Glasgow City Council which provides assistance to homeless people, including young people in the city and also commissions the Simon Community to provide a Street Team which works with daily with rough sleepers

Councillor Chris Cunningham, education, skills & early years convener from Glasgow City Council, said: “The council assists people at risk of homelessness in the city, including young people and we are happy to help promote a supplementary service which complements and enhances the work of the Glasgow Health and Social Care Partnership (GHSCP).

“Young people can feel very vulnerable and alone in certain circumstances and need to know and be reassured that there’s help, support and information available from a range of services to help them through a crisis.

“The film will be showed to all senior pupils in Glasgow schools and resonate with anyone that’s in need of assistance now and in the future – our most vulnerable young people are not alone and by working together in partnership with the Simon Community we can offer support to everyone who needs it.”

The service places young people aged 16 to 25 in a safe and warm home for the night, provided by a vetted and approved volunteer, to prevent them becoming homeless.  

Hosts offer a private bedroom, a hot meal, and shower. A range of toiletries and other essentials are also provided by Simon Community Scotland.

Nightstop is designed to prevent young people from sleeping rough, “sofa surfing”, or staying in unsuitable accommodation where they could be at risk, or even end up on the streets.

A young person can stay for one or two nights – or up to three weeks – depending on their circumstances and not necessarily with the same host. During this time the Nightstop team will provide wraparound support where necessary, led and informed by the young person.

Each host is extensively trained, has ongoing support, and there is a very significant safeguarding process in place.

Practical way to support

Nightstop: A Practical Way to Support

Our final story as part of our campaign to welcome new Nightstop hosts introduces Ian Hamilton and Claire Philip who joined the programme at the start of this year. They had been moved by experiences in London and Glasgow, and wanted to do something which was a practical way to support. 

Ian Hamilton (35) and Claire Philip (37), both lecturers in Glasgow, became hosts at the beginning of this year after Claire saw an advert for hosts at her workplace in November last year.

On a subsequent visit to London on New Year’s Day they were shocked to see the amount of people sleeping on the streets, and this spurred them on to do something practical way to support people who are threatened with becoming homeless.

The couple, who live in Maryhill, Glasgow, attended an information evening about the project and watched a documentary called “Would You Take In a Stranger?” on Channel 4 about Nightstop in Newcastle to find out more.

Ian, a sport and fitness lecturer at City of Glasgow College, and Claire an ESOL lecturer at Kelvin College, had recently bought their first house after living abroad for a few years.

As they have no children, they had a spare bedroom and wondered how to put it to good use.

Ian said: “We were upset to see so much homelessness in London and we just started thinking about what we could do to help.

“The more documentaries we watched we realised how widespread this problem is across the UK’s cities and we decided to find out more about becoming hosts for Nightstop.

“We couldn’t invite random people off the streets to use our spare room so Nightstop was the perfect solution for us.

“They try to prevent the problem of homelessness rather than just provide a sticking plaster.”

Nightstop provides support, training and advice to hosts and they carry out a number of checks on potential service users to decide whether they are suitable for the project.

In addition, Nightstop checks the availability of hosts each month and the days are marked on a calendar from available (green) to some availability (amber) and not available (red).

Nightstop also makes sure that service users get adequate support and access to other services they may need.

Service users can have dinner and breakfast with their host if they want to, but it’s left up to them to choose.

Ian and Claire were hosts for the first time in June this year to a young man who stayed with them twice for two nights.

Ian said: “He was very grateful and a bit overwhelmed in a positive way.

“He couldn’t believe there were people out there who care and who would give up their spare room to someone.

“He wanted to learn to cook and we showed him how to make a few different things for dinner.

“Our guest also wanted to tidy up and offered to take our dog for a walk which was very nice.

“Hosts are encouraged to allow their guest to choose whether they want to spend the evening with them, study, or have time alone in their room.

“Basically, it’s up to them how much time they spend with their host.”

https://twitter.com/SimonCommScot/status/1184513141008424960

The young person leaves the house with the host in the morning and arrives in the evening at a time that fits in with the host’s schedule.

Nightstop triggers a variety of support and services for users and the charity strives to find long-term accommodation for them.

Ian added: “Nightstop is very supportive with excellent communication.

“They pass on any information that we may need to know about our guest before they come to stay.

“They also check in with you when a service user has settled in to make sure everything is going well.

“We’ve never heard of anyone having any issues and service users are just very grateful to have somewhere safe and comfortable to stay.”

Deacon Blue singer Lorraine McIntosh is to host a no-obligation Nightstop Information Evening for people who are interested in finding out more about becoming a Nightstop host. It will take place this Thursday (24 October 2019). If you would like to attend please register via simonscotland.org/nightstopvolunteer

Natalie's story about Nightstop

We Had a Shared Bathroom and There was Always Needles In It: Natalie Shares Her Story

The latest story in our series to profile just how much we need to recruit new Nightstop community hosts comes from Natalie* who spent seven years without a place to call home. Could you open your home and heart to a vulnerable young person. 

Natalie* (22), was homeless for nearly seven years when she found out about Nightstop after she phoned the homelessness charity Shelter for advice.

Shelter referred her to us and we told her about our Nightstop service and she was accepted on to the programme.

Natalie became homeless when she was 15 after she left home because her relationship with her dad had broken down and her mum had passed away.

She had spent years of sleeping on friends’ sofas, staying at young people’s residential units, supported accommodation, B&B’s and hostels and even sometimes on the street, before she used our Nightstop service.

Now Natalie is studying for an HNC in Law at Motherwell College, she applied for the course with assistance from the Mungo Foundation.

After nearly seven years of waiting in Glasgow, Natalie was offered a house in Motherwell this March within a month of applying.

This was thanks to a lecturer who suggested that she should apply for a home in North Lanarkshire.

Natalie used the Nightstop service for 40 days over a few months in January to February this year.

She had a variety of hosts but she mainly stayed at two people’s homes because they had the most availability.

Natalie said: “The hosts were all really lovely, I spent more time with some than others, but I think there were only two hosts that I didn’t get to know very well.

“Even then, they were still great, very accommodating.

“The ones I stayed with for longer made me feel like I was at home, which was really nice.

“I think it just comes down to the safety, you do feel a lot safer in the accommodation that Nightstop provides.

https://twitter.com/SimonCommScot/status/1182632063809310722

“The council laughed at me when I brought up the issue of a broken lock on my door when I was previously in a B&B, but I just didn’t feel safe.

“I was living with heroin addicts and we had a shared bathroom and there was always needles in it.

“It got to the stage when I just thought I can’t stay here any longer.

“By the time I heard about Nightstop I was just so fed up.

“I wondered how much longer I’d be homeless for.

“I knew I wouldn’t get a house until I was at least 18 so I’d have to wait for years.

“I was worried I’d end up homeless my whole adult life.

“And it’s not because I’ve done anything wrong it’s just the situation I found myself in.”

Natalie was forced to give up her job as a charity fundraiser because she couldn’t take the buckets of money back to the B&B because she was worried the money would get stolen.

She added: “I’d encourage anyone who’s thinking about using Nightstop to go for it.

“When they first told me I’d be living with a stranger I was apprehensive but they were all lovely.

“It’s like a home away from home.

“Everyone is so kind and treats you with respect.

“One host let me leave some of my possessions in their house because they knew I’d be coming back and another left fresh pyjamas out for me.

“They think of everything. Some hosts give you a kettle and food in your room in case you’re too anxious to come out.

“Hosts always make sure you’re comfortable and have everything you need.”

Natalie can recall the date and the exact time she was given a house and now she’s focused on her future and passing her course in Law.

*Natalie’s name has been changed to protect her identity. 

Deacon Blue singer Lorraine McIntosh is to host a no-obligation Nightstop Information Evening for people who are interested in finding out more about becoming a Nightstop host. It will take place on Thursday (24 October 2019). If you would like to attend please register via simonscotland.org/nightstopvolunteer

Geraldine, Nightstop Glasgow host

Everyone Can Make a Difference: Our Nightstop Host Geraldine Shares Why She is a Community Host

Led by Deacon Blue star Lorraine McIntosh, we are looking for people who might consider becoming a community host with Nightstop Glasgow – perhaps even just once a month.  Geraldine Feeley is one of our longest serving hosts. 

Geraldine Feeley (53) from Easterhouse, Glasgow, has been a Nightstop host for two years.

She became a host so that she could help young people who become homeless because some members of her family have lost their homes over the years.

Geraldine has accommodated six young people so far and they have usually stayed with her for two to three nights, however one young woman stayed for three nights a week for a month.

She has always had a very positive experience and says she gets excellent support from us at Simon Community Scotland to help her to carry out the role, including regular meetings and training opportunities.

Geraldine said: “There’s no pressure to be available, it’s completely up to you.

“I tend not to ask my guests a lot of questions because I think if they want to tell me, they will.

“We have a general conversation and if they feel comfortable I’ll chat with them about their situation.

https://twitter.com/SimonCommScot/status/1184513141008424960

“Hosts need to be open minded and non-judgemental because each young person is different.”

She added: “Being a host is really rewarding, it’s nice to know I’ve done my bit.

“It’s great to get feedback about how well the young person’s getting on after they leave.

 “But I’m just one link in the chain, if everyone did their wee bit it could make a huge difference.”

Deacon Blue singer Lorraine McIntosh is to host a no-obligation Nightstop Information Evening for people who are interested in finding out more about becoming a Nightstop host. It will take place next Thursday (24 October 2019). If you would like to attend please register via simonscotland.org/nightstopvolunteer

These Kids Are Just Like Your Kids: Our Nightstop Host Miriam Shares Her Experience

Would you consider opening your home – and your heart – to a young person in Glasgow who desperately needs a safe place for the night? Our new campaign, led by Deacon Blue star Lorraine McIntosh, is looking for generous people who might just make all the difference to someone who is having a tough time. In our latest story, we feature Miriam Anwar, who recently became a Nightstop host. 

Miriam Anwar, (46), who lives with her grown-up son in the south side of Glasgow, became a host with Nightstop after working with our Street Team for a year.

She registered three months ago and hosted an under 18-year-old male on two occasions for four nights.

Miriam said: “The street team deals with the far end of homelessness, when people have been homeless for a long time, used many different services and often they’ve been let down.

“I was keen to work at the other end of the spectrum on the prevention side.

“I want to give young people a safe place to stay to prevent them from becoming homeless in the first place.

“I’ve seen for myself how long people can end up being on the streets and as a single mum I’m aware of how easy it is for things to break down at home pretty fast.

“Tempers can flare and people walk out.

“Nightstop provides excellent background support when you host.

“The immediate reaction I get from friends and family when I say I’m going to host a young homeless person is ‘Oh my God will you be safe?’ 

“But you get full disclosure of who you are taking in before they arrive.

“I say to people these kids are just like your kids, they are just going through a tough time.

“And you are never forced to host anyone, it’s ultimately your decision.”

Miriam added: “You can have very open conversations with Nightstop staff about how it’s going and they are on call day and night if anything arises.

“For me it’s been a really positive experience.

“If anyone is thinking of becoming a host I’d say drop your prejudices.

For Jamie, Nightstop Glasgow, made a significant difference to his life. This is his story…Read on and learn about becoming a community host ➡️ simonscotland.org/news/without-nightstop-jamie/

Gepostet von Simon Community Scotland am Dienstag, 15. Oktober 2019

“Forget about the homeless person label – they are just a person.

“Being a host is a chance to meet really different and interesting people and enjoy a bit of company.

“I’d recommend Nightstop to anybody, it’s brilliant.

“Opening up your home to someone could help them in a very real way.

“The impact that you can make for someone that’s going through a time of upheaval can be immense. It’s just about giving someone a bit of stability, space and safety.”

Deacon Blue singer Lorraine McIntosh is to host a no-obligation Nightstop Information Evening for people who are interested in finding out more about becoming a Nightstop host. It will take place on 24 October 2019. If you would like to attend please register via simonscotland.org/nightstopvolunteer

Lorraine’s Story: Why I’m Supporting Nightstop

We’re looking for the generous people of Glasgow to open their homes and hearts to vulnerable young people at risk by providing a bed for a night or two. Here, our ambassador, the singer and actress Lorraine McIntosh, reveals why she’s supporting our campaign.

Lorraine, from Glasgow, is popularly known as the Deacon Blue singer. She is married to Deacon Blue singer-songwriter Ricky Ross and they have three children. She has achieved notable success as an actress, starring in Scottish TV soap opera River City as Alice Henderson and appearing in Taggart.

She has also been in a few Scottish films, including Ken Loach’s My Name Is Joe and Lone Scherfig’s Wilbur Wants to Kill Himself, as well as BBC One’s comedy-drama, Hope Springs.

Lorraine is supporting Nightstop because she became homeless when she had just turned 18.

Luckily, Lorraine could stay with one of her friends until the end of term. Then she lived with her brother for a short time until she found a place of her own.

She said: “I came out of school one day and didn’t know where I was going to sleep that night.

https://twitter.com/SimonCommScot/status/1184513141008424960

“It was a really shameful and embarrassing experience and I had nowhere to turn.

“If Nightstop had been around then that would have been brilliant.

“It would have been a wonderful to walk into someone’s home and not to be asked any questions.

“Just to be offered a bedroom, a hot meal, some nice clean pyjamas and toiletries and to know the host is there if you want to talk, but it’s left up to you.

“I didn’t really want extended family members to know what was going on.

“People’s lives are complicated and staying with a stranger takes away some of the pressure of talking about painful things.”

She added: “One of the strongest messages that comes through is that if someone has become a host, they have decided to do that, and you’re not turning up at your aunties house out of the blue.

“They are saying ‘I’m here for you, this is something I want to do’.”

When Lorraine went out with the Simon Community on a street patrol she met young people with drug and alcohol problems who had been involved in really dangerous situations, such as sexual and physical violence.

She believes that if someone had been able to intervene in these young people’s early days it’s possible that their life could have been totally different.

Lorraine is to host a no-obligation Nightstop Information Evening for people who are interested in finding out more about becoming a Nightstop host. It will take place on 24 October 2019. If you would like to attend please register via simonscotland.org/nightstopvolunteer.  

Without Nightstop I Don’t Know Really Where I Would Have Ended Up – Jamie

We’re looking for the generous people of Glasgow to open their homes and hearts to vulnerable young people at risk by providing a bed for a night or two. As part of our campaign, we are profiling some of the guests and their hosts, to find out what Nightstop Glasgow means to them. We kick-off with Jamie Hughes…

Jamie Hughes (18) used Nightstop in February 2018 after he was kicked out of his family home where he lived with his mum and younger brother.

He’d been arguing a lot with his brother, and due to his mum’s poor health, she felt that she could no longer cope with Jamie living at home with them.

Unusually, Jamie stayed with the same Nightstop host for five nights, then he was transferred by our Nightstop team to a hostel until they could find more permanent housing for him.

Jamie, who is currently undergoing hormone therapy treatment to transition from female to male, said: “Usually you just stay with a host for three nights, so I was very lucky to be with the same person for all five nights.

Deacon Blue star Lorraine McIntosh today launches our new campaign, asking people in Glasgow to ‘open their hearts and homes’ to some of the most vulnerable young people in her home city. In this new film, Lorraine visits Geraldine, one of our Nightstop Glasgow community hosts to find out more…

Gepostet von Simon Community Scotland am Freitag, 11. Oktober 2019

“When someone from the Simon Community told me about Nightstop scheme I was very suspicious at first.

“It all sounded a bit sketchy, but I’m so glad that I did it now.

“Without Nightstop I don’t know really where I would have ended up.

“I could have easily been forced to sleep on the streets.

“The Simon Community has really helped me by providing me with somewhere to live from the start.

“I’d encourage anyone else who ends up homeless to keep an open mind about Nightstop and to relax – it will all work out just fine.

“The Nightstop team really look after you and the hosts make you feel very welcome.”

Jamie now lives in longer-term shared accommodation in the south side of Glasgow with one other person, which was arranged through our Shared Living housing scheme.

He’s currently studying Care at college and his passion is youth work because he wants to help other young people who find themselves in difficult life situations.

Deacon Blue singer Lorraine McIntosh is to host a no-obligation Nightstop Information Evening for people who are interested in finding out more about becoming a Nightstop host. It will take place on 24 October 2019. If you would like to attend please register via simonscotland.org/nightstopvolunteer.  

Deacon Blue Star Calls on People of Glasgow to Open Their Doors for New Nightstop Campaign

Deacon Blue star Lorraine McIntosh today launches our new campaign, asking people in Glasgow to ‘open their hearts and homes’ to some of the most vulnerable young people in her home city. In this new film, Lorraine visits Geraldine, one of our Nightstop Glasgow community hosts to find out more…

Gepostet von Simon Community Scotland am Freitag, 11. Oktober 2019

Deacon Blue star Lorraine McIntosh has asked the people of Glasgow to ‘open their homes and hearts’ to some of the most vulnerable young people in her home city.

Lorraine is supporting our Simon Community Scotland Nightstop campaign, after revealing she was homeless at the age of 18, an experience which has lived with her for more than 35 years.

Now also a well-known actress, Lorraine remembers how ashamed and embarrassed she felt when her family lost their home overnight when she was 18.

For that reason, the 55-year-old is backing our campaign to encourage people to become ‘hosts’ for as much or little time as they can.

Nightstop prevents people experiencing homelessness through community hosting – providing a safety net to those who have been forced to leave their home.

The programme places young people aged 16 to 25 in a safe and warm home for the night, provided by a vetted and approved volunteer.

Deacon Blue star Lorraine McIntosh is supporting our campaign to encourage people in Glasgow to become Nightstop community hosts

Hosts offer a private bedroom, a hot meal, and shower. A range of toiletries and other essentials are also provided by us at Simon Community Scotland.

Nightstop is designed to prevent young people from sleeping rough, “sofa surfing”, or staying in unsuitable accommodation where they could be at risk.

A young person can stay for one or two nights – or up to three weeks – depending on their circumstances and not necessarily with the same host.

During this time the Nightstop team will provide wraparound support where necessary, led and informed by the young person.

Lorraine McIntosh said, “I came out of school one day and didn’t know where I was going to sleep that night. It was a really shameful and embarrassing experience and I had nowhere to turn.

“If Nightstop had been around then for me that would have been brilliant.

“Just to be offered a bedroom, a hot meal, some nice clean pyjamas and toiletries and to know you can talk to someone if you want to, but that’s left up to you.”

Our Chief Executive Lorraine McGrath added: “We’re calling upon the people of Glasgow to open their hearts and homes, by helping us help young people in desperate need. These young people are often coming from extremely difficult circumstances, and a safe, calm place to rest for the night is critically important.

“Last year when we launched, we provided 96 nights of accommodation for young people, but we expect this to rise this winter, after we launch a new awareness campaign for young people across the city.

“Being a host might mean being available as little as one night per month, or more if possible. Each host that joins us is extensively trained, has ongoing support, and all of our work is underpinned with a very significant safeguarding process.”

Lorraine McIntosh is to host a no-obligation Nightstop Information Evening for people who think they may be able to host. It will take place on 24 October 2019.

If you would like to attend please register via simonscotland.org/nightstopvolunteer.

We Have a New Service in Perthshire!: Here’s What You Need to Know

Earlier this year we saw an opportunity to deliver a homeless outreach service in Perthshire and we jumped at the chance to take it! We spent many hours planning and preparing with the intent of doing the best job we can for those who need us most. One of the things we wanted to do was hold a roadshow in Perth… so we did! At the end of September, our CEO and Director of Services went to Dunkeld, Birnam, Aberfeldy, and Pitlochry to meet all of the lovely Perthshire people and discuss what we plan on doing for those experiencing homelessness in their area. The roadshow had a great turnout and so many people were excited to see Simon Community Scotland start work in the Perthshire area.

We opened our new Perthshire service on Monday 14th October! Our amazing team there will be out and about, reaching far and wide to provide support to anyone experiencing homelessness (being in unsafe, unsuitable, and/or insecure accommodation) in the Perthshire area. Our team are dedicated, passionate and ambitious and will always do what they can to #MakeItRight. 

We are working in partnership with Perth and Kinross Council to deliver a housing support service that responds quickly to help the people we support to secure a safe place to live. Our team of ten highly skilled staff will be out in the communities making connections, partnerships and working with individuals to find solutions.

Our new service aims to support people to retain or move into a safe tenancy. For many, it will be the very first time they have been given a tenancy and so through person-centred support plans we will equip people with the skills required to facilitate the transition and turn their house into a home. We will support people to access the benefits they are entitled to, instil confidence in someone to access their community resources and just about anything else that the individual needs. We will typically support someone for a period of 6 to 9 months before they move on to newer and brighter pastures! #MakeItHappen

Our Director of Services, Hugh, said:

‘It’s easy to walk through some of Perthshires towns and not consider homelessness as something relevant to that community. Sadly, it couldn’t be further from the truth. Whilst there is little – if any – rough sleeping, there are people living in unsuitable or unsafe accommodation. We hear of people in caravans with no running water, people experiencing significant mental health problems caused by neighbour issues they can’t complain about, people working long hours for low wages – still unable to afford the rents, AirB&B and holiday cottages pushing rental properties out the community and people living in poor conditions but unable to complain because they feel there is no other option. These are issues that go unseen and unnoticed, people get on with it but it has a huge impact on their quality of life, relationships, income, physical health and even mental health… we want to help change that’.

At Simon Community Scotland we strongly believe in supporting people to find solutions to the issues they face and to move forward towards a safe home and stable life. For many, being homeless is about living with continual insecurity and little sense of value. It is really important to us that people experience something different with us. We work hard to provide safe, welcoming places where people have time to think, to re-evaluate, to make choices and not be judged or punished. We want everyone to be able to reach their own potential in their own home, finding solutions that work for them.

Keep up-to-date with Simon Community Scotland by following us on social media @SimonCommScot or keep clicking through our website to find out more about us!

Streetwork Gets a Makeover! Find Out the Story Behind the New Look

How It Started…

Streetwork joined our Simon Community family earlier this year. We’ve been so proud to welcome this incredible service in Edinburgh. Every day, across all our services, we offer compassionate, flexible and skilled support to people facing extremely difficult situations. At Simon Community Scotland, we work hard to demonstrate our values in everything we do – including how we look and feel.

As a team, we looked at the Streetwork logo and knew it was time for something different. For many people, the old logo, with the yellow and black colour scheme, felt too harsh. We wanted to develop something that better captured our energy and spirit, and also showed Streetwork as part of the Simon Community family. 

We wanted our new look in Edinburgh to capture the things people felt were really important in our work. We wanted our look to resonate feelings of care, compassion, ambition, leadership, development, creativity, vibrancy, passion, inspiration, energy and enthusiasm.

To get the ball rolling, we asked all of our staff in Edinburgh to join discussions on the new look. We reviewed their existing logos (and those throughout the sector) and considered how it made us feel. We also looked at our values and the existing Simon Community Scotland look to shape and inform our decisions and inspire our overall design.

In the end, we decided that we wanted the phrases below to guide the design process. For us they represent the first emotional impression we want people to have when they see our new logo or engage with someone in our team:

  • hope, positive change
  • welcome, warm, positive
  • compassionate, caring, helpful
  • relationships, connection, diversity
  • trustworthy, safety, professional, credible
  • energy, action, dynamic

It’s about people first and foremost…

These qualities really matter because we are here to offer support to people who are experiencing really tough situations – and who often don’t receive consistent warmth and kindness. We want to be a place and a community who demonstrate welcome, offering practical and emotional support that feels positive and can bring hope. For someone visiting us, we know this positive welcome starts before someone even enters the building! We feel really proud to have a new look that reflects this sense of friendly, hopeful energy. 

Launch Day!

We launched the new Streetwork look on Friday 23rd August 2019. To celebrate, we had a staff gathering at our Southbridge building and Holyrood Hub in Edinburgh. Walking down the stairs, the atmosphere was buzzing with energy. There was bunting and balloons, teas and coffees, biscuits and banter. We also set up a display of all our new merchandise and, of course, there were delicious cupcakes… decorated with our logo! Holyrood Hub was also full of energy and more cake! It was great to hear people’s first impressions of the new look. 

Our CEO, Lorraine, and our Director of Services, Hugh, paid us a visit on the day. They arrived to an eager gathering of staff and then shared a few words alongside Jan, our Assistant Director at Streetwork. Behind them was a fantastic display of the new merchandise and clothing – all adorned with the new Streetwork logo!

After the opening words, everyone was invited to tuck into the lovely cakes and tea and many came over to Zora, our videographer (and Digital Inclusion Co-Ordinator) to share their feelings on the new look.

Big thanks to everyone in the team for their input and hard work in making this happen! We are so proud to have a look that captures the spirit and energy of our work and what we try to offer others. We want people to know and feel warmth, welcome and hope every day!

Here’s what our staff had to say about the new look for Streetwork.